Sharing material online

What can we share online? Who owns the material? How safe are we when sharing online?

Introduction: Increasingly, we are all becoming creators, publishers and authors online. More and more schools share their stories in this public forum. But what does this mean for teachers and students? How much should we share of ourselves online? When it is too much information? What about permissions? And what are some of the other issues associated with sharing online?


"Offering global access to student information and images has very serious implications regarding privacy and safety." Netsafe's School Website links This link also provides some important things to consider when developing or updating school websites. For more information on safe ways to post

material online, go to Netsafe's link on Posting Stuff Online.







The following discussions have been raised by Dorothy and Russell Burt and were originally posted in Suzie Vesper's Learning Web 2.0 wiki. The responses in this link are from one school's perspective - Point England. The following tasks invite you to share what course of action has your school taken to address some of these issues.


external image 198203392_5fc120adcb_t.jpg
Introduction: Ethical issue - Ownership. Teachers and students create material online all the time. Are they aware of the long-term ramifications of this as discussed in Learning Web 2.0 wiki?

Question:

Who owns the account and materials posted online - the individual teacher, school or student?
How long are materials left online once posted? What happens when a student leaves the school? When a teacher leaves the school?



Reflection: Do you have similar stories to share? Leave a message in the DISCUSSION tab above (this will appear in the thread below).

external image 4105726930_c42e8b12b9_t.jpg
Introduction: Ethical issue - Privacy v publicity, professional vs private. Teachers and students leave a digital footprint online. Sometimes this crosses boundaries between school, work our professional lives and into our home or private lives. For more resources on Digital footprint, go to Netsafe's digital footprint What are the implications of this as discussed in Learning Web 2.0 wiki?

Question:

Do schools have any responsibility in relation to the way students behave in online social networking sites such as Bebo?
Should schools set any expectations on staff in relation to the way they behave in online spaces and networks?



Reflection: Is this worth exploring further? Leave a message in the DISCUSSION tab above (this will appear in the thread below).

external image 4309772192_8e4ce6dc33_t.jpg
Introduction: Ethical issue - Keeping it real. As discussed in Learning Web 2.0 wiki, how much of ourselves do we share online?

Question:

How do we help students understand the importance of identity and what personas are appropriate to use in online contexts?




Reflection: Netsafe's link to Your Online Profile. How can we teach our students about their digital footprint? Leave a message in the DISCUSSION tab above (this will appear in the thread below).

external image 2773519487_2ba8bc1d76_t.jpg
Introduction: Ethical issue - Anonymity online. As discussed in Learning Web 2.0 wiki, are there dangers in being anonymous?

Question:

When is it appropriate to be anonymous and when is it potentially harmful?



Reflection: What are your ideas about this issue? Leave a message in the DISCUSSION tab above (this will appear in the thread below). For more on privacy and anonymity, go to Netsafe's link at Privacy and Anonymity on the Net

Subject Author Replies Views Last Message
No Comments




Additional resources to consider:

Point England School blog - how to manage online spaces when they roll over
https://sites.google.com/a/ptengland.school.nz/blog-rollover/home


Blogging Safely
http://www.netsafe.org.nz/keeping_safe.php?pageID=142&sectionID=adults&menuID=106